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Bees Teaching Each Other

When the light is low, it’s possible to follow a bee’s flight path. On occasion, a couple of bees leave a hive at the same time, and fly in close formation. After many observations it was obvious that one bee was following the other. Was it being taught? Small cell colonies initially detect and remove mite […]

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Beebread and Core Gut Bacteria

Randy Oliver has published part 3 in his Re-evaluating Beebread series. This series and his other articles are worth reading. For me, that’s good news, as it  leads beekeepers from the nuke em disease/pest treatment model, to a more probiotic/symbiotic approach. And while at Randy’s site, take a look around. It’s all good. -bW

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Bees and Hexagons

Radiolab does it again. Solved! A bee-buzzing, honey-licking 2,000-year-old mystery that begins here, with this beehive. Look at the honeycomb in the photo and ask yourself: (I know you’ve been wondering this all your life, but have been too shy to ask out loud … ) Why is every cell in this honeycomb a hexagon? […]

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Co-evolution of Bees and Mites

At Beesource, Mike Bispham shared a paper describing the co-evolution of two European bee populations. Host Adaptations Reduce the Reproductive Success of Varroa Destructor in Two Distinct European Honey Bee Populations Dr. Tom Seeley suggested a similar process is at work in the Arnot Forest near Cornell University. Check it out. Years ago, I setup […]

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