Apis Cerana Japonica the Traditional Japanese Way

Hi Guys

Interested in natural beekeeping around the world? Check out Mituro36’s YouTube Channel. He uses a traditional Japanese hive that has much in common with the Warre’ hive. I’ve thought that such a hive, without the interference of the traditional top bars, might be a more natural hive for the bees.

Here’s how he makes the hive. And what a neat way to show how it’s done!

And check out his Japanese bees, Apis cerana japonica. Watch how they jointly guard their hive entrance. It’s a different bee and they do it differently than our western Apis mellefera honeybees. Their coordinated reactions sure keep that giant wasp at bay.

Additional video links are posted on Mituro36’s Facebook Page. Need more zip for your sport’s drink? I know what it’s missing. 🙂

And thanks to the guys at the WarreBeekeeping for reminding me of Mituro’s videos. It has been awhile since I’d stopped by his site for a visit. I appreciate the English versions. Thanks Mituro.

Enjoy!

-bW

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9 responses to “Apis Cerana Japonica the Traditional Japanese Way”

  1. Armin Thiele says:

    Hi Dennis, thanks a lot for these great links!

    • Mark Stadler says:

      Dennis,I am a new Bee and have no equiptment other than smoker,brush hive tool,hood-jacket -veil,2- 3# pkgs of italians in spring,I want to get as natural as possible here in N Missouri.I have looked at all your site.Miichael ,,Bushes,Chandlers,Beesource,and lots more??Too much info??? I like your combo hive and thought of starting with that and small cell all plastic frames cut out to leave 1 row of foundation all the way around,then stack ten frames as needed as you point out.???the try top bars as I gain experience??build my own hives. What if you could start from scratch would you use?You seem too have great intuitive Bee sence!! Thanks!! Mark

      • -bW says:

        Hi Mark

        Sounds like you have a great plan.

        The first few years of beekeeping have more to do with getting a new beekeeper familiar and comfortable with the bees than trying to work with many of the nuances noted in those websites. Keep the principles in mind. But just get those bees stabilized in your new hive.

        No need to initially cut out the frame centers. That can be done later of you choose.

        Good luck Mark. Let me know how things go for you.

        -bW

      • Mark Stadler says:

        Dennis, Thanks for the confidence builder!I’ll do as you suggest.I have to thank you for all the love and work you put in this site,what a GREAT!! boon for us new beeks!.It is Beeknown that you are master Beeman with Beesense and are Beeloved,Mark

      • -bW says:

        Hi Mark

        You are gracious. Lately I think I’ve been more beefuddled than anything else.

        -bW

  2. Journey11 says:

    Wow, that was totally fascinating! I went over to Mituro’s website and watched several more videos there. I was on the edge of my seat, biting my nails throughout the one that showed a western honeybee massacre. I may have nightmares about that one!

    • -bW says:

      Hi Journey11

      Those bees defending their entrance could be taught to “dance” to a different beat. Maybe a new bee dance YouTube sensation? The Bee Gees Dancers? 🙂

      -bW

  3. juliana says:

    off topic, but I’m v bad at technology. How do you feed kombucha to the bees? I use it to spray them, instead of smoke when I open the hive, but when i put it next to the hive in a bowl, they didn’t go for it, and it’s v good kombucha! Thanks for your thoughts. Juliana

    • -bW says:

      Hi Juliana

      I’ve only sprayed a few hives with kombucha as a test much like you have done.

      -bW

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