Month: December 2011

Honey Strainer

Honey Strainer

It’s easy to build a simple strainer, that uses gravity, to separate honey from beeswax. It consists of: a bucket lid a 5 gallon elastic nylon paint strainer bag a small wood block a bucket with holes drilled in the bottom a bucket with a […]

Bee Unto Others

Bee Unto Others

Interested in beneficial bacteria in bees? How about bee probiotics? Checkout Laurie Ramona Herboldsheimer’s Micro Refs. Dean and Laurie are active in the small cell/treatment free beekeeping scene. They’ve recorded much original video/content that would make a great addition to BeeUntoOthers. I hope they can […]

Honey Production

Honey Production

A colony doesn’t mindlessly work floral sources. When they have enough reserves, and their population is optimal, hive activity decreases including foraging. Exceptionally large surpluses don’t naturally occur. Storing an excess surplus would: needlessly increasing foraging risks stress bees as they prepare for winter clogs […]

Failed Comb

Failed Comb

No Problem Combs can fail for many reasons. They become physically stressed by: removing top bars without cutting all the attachments cutting attachments the wrong way poor top bar handling techniques handling new, heavy comb too soon A single comb failure posses little risk to […]

Comb

Comb

Managing comb keeps top bar hives workable. To manage top bar hive comb, a beekeeper must know how to: cut comb make comb corrections get straight workable comb space comb adjust comb thickness rotate comb Natural broodnests appears messy, especially compared to frame and foundation […]

Swarming

Swarming

Any organism that has enough vigor, resources and motivation remakes. Bees are no exception. Bees raise drones before swarming. It indicates a colony is vigorous and has enough resources to reproduce. Later, after the first drones hatch, queen cups are built. Then bees fill the […]